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More than 60,000 stolen digital profiles are currently up for sale on Genesis Store, a private and invitation-only online cybercriminal market discovered and exposed by Kaspersky Lab researchers.

“The profiles include: browser fingerprints, website user logins and passwords, cookies, credit card information. The price varies from 5 to 200 dollars per profile – it heavily depends on the value of the stolen information,” said the researchers.

A digital fingerprint is a complex collection of system properties up to 100 attributes, from IP addresses, screen size, device ID, timezone, GPU/CPU info, cookies, and many others—and user behavioral characteristics that can range from the user interests and custom system configuration changes to the time spent on specific websites and mouse movement behavior.

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FireEye today released Commando VM, a first of its kind Windows-based security distribution for penetration testing and red teaming.

When it comes to the best-operating systems for hackers, Kali Linux is always the first choice for penetration testers and ethical hackers.

However, Kali is a Linux-based distribution, and using Linux without learning some basics is not everyone’s cup of tea as like Windows or macOS operating systems.

Moreover, if you are wondering why there is no popular Windows-based operating system for hackers? First, because Windows is not open-source and second, manually installing penetration testing tools on Windows is pretty problematic for most users.

To help researchers and cyber security enthusiasts, cybersecurity firm FireEye today released virtual machine (VM) based installer for Commando VM—a customized Windows-based distribution that comes pre-installed with useful penetration testing tools, just like Kali Linux.

“Penetration testers commonly use their own variants of Windows machines when assessing Active Directory environments,” FireEye says. “Commando VM was designed specifically to be the go-to platform for performing these internal penetration tests.”

The release 1.0 includes two different VM images, one based upon Windows 7 and another Windows 10.

Both Commando VMs include more than 140 tools, including Nmap, Wireshark, Remote Server Administration Tools, Mimikatz, Burp-Suite, x64db, Metasploit, PowerSploit, Hashcat, and Owasp ZAP, pre-configured for a smooth working environment.

 

According to one of the authors of Commando VMs, the following are the top three features of the tool that make it more interesting:

  • Native Windows protocol support (SMB, PowerShell, RSAT, Sysinternals, etc.)
  • Organized toolsets (Tools folder on the desktop with Info Gathering, Exploitation, Password Attacks, etc.)
  • Windows-based C2 frameworks like Covenant (dotnet) and PoshC2 (PowerShell)

 

“With such versatility, Commando VM aims to be the de facto Windows machine for every penetration tester and red teamer,” FireEye says.

“The versatile tool sets included in Commando VM provide blue teams with the tools necessary to audit their networks and improve their detection capabilities. With a library of offensive tools, it makes it easy for blue teams to keep up with offensive tooling and attack trends.”

According to FireEye, Commando VM also uses Boxstarter, Chocolatey, and MyGet packages to install all software packages. Running a single command will automatically update all your installed hacking software on Commando VM.

To use this on your Windows computer, you need at least 60 GB of free hard drive space, 2GB of RAM and a virtual machine software, like VMware or Oracle VirtualBox installed on your system.

Installing Commando VM is pretty easy. Just download the Commando VM, decompress it and then execute the PowerShell script available in the package to complete the installation.

The remaining installation process will be done automatically, which may take between 2 to 3 hours to finish depending upon your Internet speed.

“The VM will reboot multiple times due to the numerous software installation requirements,” FireEye says. “Once the installation completes, the PowerShell prompt remains open waiting for you to hit any key before exiting.”

After the completion of the installation process, you’ll be presented with Commando VM, and all you need to do is reboot your machine to ensure the final configuration changes take effect.

In recent years, we have been asked by a number of our readers to list some of the best Windows-based operating systems for penetration testing. Commando VM is the first, and now I believe we will have more to this list really soon.

 

The information contained in this website is for general information purposes only. The information is gathered from The Hacker News while we endeavour to keep the information up to date and correct, we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose. Any reliance you place on such information is therefore strictly at your own risk.
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Microsoft is going to release its Windows Defender ATP antivirus software for Mac computers. Microsoft on Thursday announced that the company is bringing its anti-malware software to Apple’s macOS operating system as well and to more platforms soon, like Linux.

As a result, the technology giant renamed its Windows Defender Advanced Threat Protection (ATP) to Microsoft Defender Advanced Threat Protection (ATP) in an attempt to minimize name-confusion and reflect the cross-platform nature of the software suite.

For all those wondering if Mac even gets viruses—macOS is generally more secure than Windows, but in recent years cyber criminals have started paying attention to the Mac platform, making it a new target for viruses, Trojans, spyware, adware, ransomware, backdoors, and other nefarious applications.

Moreover, hackers have been successful many times. Remember the dangerous FruitFly malware that infected thousands of Mac computers, the recently discovered cryptocurrency-stealing malware CookieMiner and DarthMiner.

Microsoft Defender ATP Antivirus for Mac

Microsoft has now come up with a dedicated Defender ATP client for Mac, offering full anti-virus and threat protection with the ability to perform full, quick, and custom scans, giving macOS users “next-generation protection and endpoint detection and response coverage” as its Windows counterpart.

“We’ve been working closely with industry partners to enable Windows Defender Advanced Threat Protection (ATP) customers to protect their non-Windows devices while keeping a centralized “single pane of glass” experience,” Microsoft says in a blog post.

Microsoft also promised to add Endpoint Detection and Response, and Defender ATP’s new Threat and Vulnerability Management (TVM) capabilities in public preview next month.

TVM uses a risk-based approach to help security teams discovery, prioritize, and remediate known vulnerabilities and misconfigurations using a mixture of real-time insights, added context during incident investigations and built-in remediation processes through Microsoft’s Intune and System Center Configuration Manager.

For now, the tech giant has released Microsoft Defender ATP for Mac (compatible with macOS Mojave, macOS High Sierra, or macOS Sierra) in limited preview for businesses that have both Windows and Mac computer systems.

 

//www.youtube.com/watch?v=26z6SwScYx4

Like MS Office for Mac, Defender for Mac will also use Microsoft AutoUpdate software to get the latest features and fixes on time. While Microsoft has announced its plans to launch Defender ATP for more platforms in the future, the company has not explicitly named those platforms.

Also, it is not clear if Microsoft is also planning to launch a consumer version of Microsoft Defender for Mac users in the future. Microsoft’s business customers can sign up here for the limited preview.

In the attempt to make its security software available to more people, Microsoft just last week released Windows Defender extensions for Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome as well.

 

The information contained in this website is for general information purposes only. The information is gathered from The Hacker News while we endeavour to keep the information up to date and correct, we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose. Any reliance you place on such information is therefore strictly at your own risk.
Through this website, you are able to link to other websites which are not under the control of CSIRT-CY. We have no control over the nature, content and availability of those sites. The inclusion of any links does not necessarily imply a recommendation or endorse the views expressed within them.
Every effort is made to keep the website up and running smoothly. However, CSIRT-CY takes no responsibility for, and will not be liable for, the website being temporarily unavailable due to technical issues beyond our control.

Online Trust Alliance spells out best practices for testing, purchasing, networking and updating IoT devices to make them and the enterprise more secure.

Here’s a handy list of tips that can help you avoid the most common mistakes that business IT pros make when bringing IoT devices onto enterprise networks. The list centers on awareness and minimizing access to less-secure devices. Having a strong understanding of what devices are actually on the network, what they’re allowed to do, and how secure they are at the outset is key to a successful IoT security strategy.

  • Every password on every device should be updated from the default, and any device that has an unchangeable default password shouldn’t be used at all. Permissions need to be as minimal as possible to allow devices to function.
  • Everything that goes on your network, as well as any associated back-end or cloud services that work with it, needs to be carefully researched before it’s put into production.
  • It’s a good idea to have a separate network, behind a firewall and under careful monitoring, for IoT devices whenever possible. This helps keep potentially insecure devices away from core networks and resources.
  • Don’t use features you don’t need – the OTA gives the example of a smart TV used for display only, which means you can definitely deactivate its microphone and even its connectivity.
  • Look for the physical compromise – anything with a hardware “factory reset” switch, open port or default password is vulnerable.
  • Gizmos that connect automatically to open Wi-Fi networks are a bad idea. Make sure they don’t do that.
  • If you can’t block all incoming traffic to your IoT devices, make sure that there aren’t open software ports that a malefactor could use to control them.
  • Encryption is a great thing. If there’s any way you can get your IoT devices to send and receive their data using encryption, do it.
  • Updates are also a good and great thing – whether you’ve got to manually check every month or your devices update on their own, make sure they’re getting patches. Don’t use equipment that can’t get updates.
  • Underlining the above, don’t use products that are no longer supported by their manufacturers or that can no longer be secured.

 

The information contained in this website is for general information purposes only. The information is gathered from Computer World while we endeavour to keep the information up to date and correct, we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose. Any reliance you place on such information is therefore strictly at your own risk.
Through this website, you are able to link to other websites which are not under the control of CSIRT-CY. We have no control over the nature, content and availability of those sites. The inclusion of any links does not necessarily imply a recommendation or endorse the views expressed within them.
Every effort is made to keep the website up and running smoothly. However, CSIRT-CY takes no responsibility for, and will not be liable for, the website being temporarily unavailable due to technical issues beyond our control.

The U.S. National Counterintelligence and Security Center (NCSC) has started to distribute informative materials ranging from brochures to videos to privately held companies around the country promoting increased awareness of rising cybersecurity threats from nation-state actors.

“Make no mistake, American companies are squarely in the cross-hairs of well-financed nation-state actors, who are routinely breaching private sector networks, stealing proprietary data, and compromising supply chains,” stated NCSC Director William Evanina.

Evanina also said that “The attacks are persistent, aggressive, and cost our nation jobs, economic advantage, and hundreds of billions of dollars.”

The campaign provides detailed info on the growing threat from foreign state hackers

NCSC is an Office of the Director of National Intelligence center, and it is designed to provide counterintelligence and security expertise in several areas, ranging from insider threat and supply chain risk management to personnel security.

To fight against this growing threat, NCSC decided to provide the U.S. private sector with the information it needs to understand and defend against cyber intrusions initiated by foreign governments.

 

Private sector also warned of rising foreign threat in December

This follows a statement made by Bill Priestap, Assistant Director, Counterintelligence Division of the FBI before the Senate Judiciary Committee in December 2018:

Many American businesses are just now starting to understand the new environment in which they are operating. The continued proliferation of cyber hacking tools and human intelligence capabilities means that this environment will only become more hostile and more treacherous for our companies. Our businesses face competitors in the form of aforeign enterprises assisted or directed by extremely capable intelligence and security services.

The materials distributed by the NCSC to raise awareness among private sector companies are part of a campaign dubbed “Know the Risk, Raise Your Shield.”

Moreover, the disseminated materials cover a wide range of subjects, from supply chain risks, spear-phishing, and social engineering, to economic espionage, social media deception, foreign travel risks, and mobile device safety.

The information contained in this website is for general information purposes only. The information is gathered from Bleeping Computer while we endeavour to keep the information up to date and correct, we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose. Any reliance you place on such information is therefore strictly at your own risk.
Through this website, you are able to link to other websites which are not under the control of CSIRT-CY. We have no control over the nature, content and availability of those sites. The inclusion of any links does not necessarily imply a recommendation or endorse the views expressed within them.
Every effort is made to keep the website up and running smoothly. However, CSIRT-CY takes no responsibility for, and will not be liable for, the website being temporarily unavailable due to technical issues beyond our control.