Security News

Cyber-attacks cost affected small business an average of A 10,000 in 2017 – a 56% increase over 2016 said Norton by Symantec.

Its Norton SMB Cyber Security Survey Australia 2017 reveals 23% of Small to Medium businesses had a cyber-attack last year.

Some 37% of SMBs don’t think they would remain in business if denied critical information for just one week.

“Cyber attacks have the potential to significantly affect how a business operates. How it is perceived by customers, particularly in the event of lengthy downtime or a data breach is vital. Cyber attacks have the power to cripple SMBs, regardless of industry,” said Mark Gorrie, Director, Norton Business Unit, Symantec Pacific Region.

Ransomware is still the preferred method of cyber-attack

Given data is so valuable and lack of effective backup it is not surprising that ransomware affected 10% of SMBs and 16% paid.

Interestingly 22% of SMBs that had experienced a cyber-attack before were more likely to pay the ransom.

Back-up or crack-up

Only 32% of SMBs bother to regularly backup valuable data. Let’s not even discuss whether its real back-up that works – tested, replicable, restorable and stored off-site.

But the message is getting through – back up ‘continuously’ to an off-site location and back-up both the operating environment and data so that a restore is quick.

Internet security is no longer a luxury

Sign-ups for internet (cloud) based security protection was up 19% to 87%.

Internet security sign-ups to prevent potential threats was 60%. Some 34% believed it was simply good business practice.

Older business operators (50-59 years) were more likely to implement internet security solutions as part of good business practice.

Password protection of company devices (laptops, PCs, tablets and smartphone) was up in 2017 (80-88%). This compares to 72-82% in 2016.

There were fewer opportunities for compromise/access of sensitive information by unauthorised persons. Fewer micro-and-small business operators accessed financial data from a mobile (36%) or personal device (46%) compared to those surveyed in 2016.

A scam in sheep’s clothing

Phishing (54%) remains the primary point of cyber-attack. But, hacking (36%) is next – if a computer is exposed to the internet hackers can find and try to penetrate it.

Employees stealing, losing or compromising data was way down – education is working.

Public Wi-Fi is dangerous

40% now use VPN’s with public Wi-Fi. A further 35% will not use Public open Wi-Fi but look for coffee shops etc., that require a password.

But that leaves 25% without protection in a public Wi-Fi minefield.

Norton says you can reduce cyber-attacks

  • Don’t wait for a cyber-attack – go on the defensive and harden your cybersecurity by installing cybersecurity software
  • Invest in comprehensive backup – not a USB or external hard disk
  • Keep equipment patched and up-to-date. Too many cyber-attacks use old vulnerabilities.
  • Get employees involved – cybersecurity is everyone’s business if they want a business to employ them
  • Use strong passwords. Never share and never use convenient, obvious passwords.
  • Think about your risk and investigate if cyber insurance is a good idea

“As the financial and operational impact of cyber attacks become harder for SMBs to ignore, business owners and operators are beginning to knuckle down and get the basics right. From using passwords, two-step verification and back up, to the more complex tasks of regulating access to Company data. With the introduction of Australia’s new mandatory data breach disclosure laws, we expect more Australian SMBs will go from seeing cybersecurity as a ‘nice to have’ to a critical piece in securing the future success of their business,” said Gorrie.

 

The information contained in this website is for general information purposes only. The information is gathered from Gadget Guy while we endeavour to keep the information up to date and correct, we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose. Any reliance you place on such information is therefore strictly at your own risk.
Through this website, you are able to link to other websites which are not under the control of CSIRT-CY. We have no control over the nature, content and availability of those sites. The inclusion of any links does not necessarily imply a recommendation or endorse the views expressed within them.
Every effort is made to keep the website up and running smoothly. However, CSIRT-CY takes no responsibility for, and will not be liable for, the website being temporarily unavailable due to technical issues beyond our control.

The U.S. National Counterintelligence and Security Center (NCSC) has started to distribute informative materials ranging from brochures to videos to privately held companies around the country promoting increased awareness of rising cybersecurity threats from nation-state actors.

“Make no mistake, American companies are squarely in the cross-hairs of well-financed nation-state actors, who are routinely breaching private sector networks, stealing proprietary data, and compromising supply chains,” stated NCSC Director William Evanina.

Evanina also said that “The attacks are persistent, aggressive, and cost our nation jobs, economic advantage, and hundreds of billions of dollars.”

The campaign provides detailed info on the growing threat from foreign state hackers

NCSC is an Office of the Director of National Intelligence center, and it is designed to provide counterintelligence and security expertise in several areas, ranging from insider threat and supply chain risk management to personnel security.

To fight against this growing threat, NCSC decided to provide the U.S. private sector with the information it needs to understand and defend against cyber intrusions initiated by foreign governments.

 

Private sector also warned of rising foreign threat in December

This follows a statement made by Bill Priestap, Assistant Director, Counterintelligence Division of the FBI before the Senate Judiciary Committee in December 2018:

Many American businesses are just now starting to understand the new environment in which they are operating. The continued proliferation of cyber hacking tools and human intelligence capabilities means that this environment will only become more hostile and more treacherous for our companies. Our businesses face competitors in the form of aforeign enterprises assisted or directed by extremely capable intelligence and security services.

The materials distributed by the NCSC to raise awareness among private sector companies are part of a campaign dubbed “Know the Risk, Raise Your Shield.”

Moreover, the disseminated materials cover a wide range of subjects, from supply chain risks, spear-phishing, and social engineering, to economic espionage, social media deception, foreign travel risks, and mobile device safety.

The information contained in this website is for general information purposes only. The information is gathered from Bleeping Computer while we endeavour to keep the information up to date and correct, we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose. Any reliance you place on such information is therefore strictly at your own risk.
Through this website, you are able to link to other websites which are not under the control of CSIRT-CY. We have no control over the nature, content and availability of those sites. The inclusion of any links does not necessarily imply a recommendation or endorse the views expressed within them.
Every effort is made to keep the website up and running smoothly. However, CSIRT-CY takes no responsibility for, and will not be liable for, the website being temporarily unavailable due to technical issues beyond our control.

A massive malware outbreak that last week infected nearly half a million computers with cryptocurrency mining malware in just a few hours was caused by a backdoored version of popular BitTorrent client called MediaGet.

Dubbed Dofoil (also known as Smoke Loader), the malware was found dropping a cryptocurrency miner program as payload on infected Windows computers that mine Electroneum digital coins for attackers using victims’ CPU cycles. Dofoil campaign that hit PCs in Russia, Turkey, and Ukraine on 6th March was discovered by Microsoft Windows Defender research department and blocked the attack before it could have done any severe damages.

At the time when Windows Defender researchers detected this attack, they did not mention how the malware was delivered to such a massive audience in just 12 hours. However, after investigation Microsoft revealed that the attackers targeted the update mechanism of MediaGet BitTorrent software to push its trojanized version (mediaget.exe) to users’ computers.

A signed mediaget.exe downloads an update.exe program and runs it on the machine to install a new mediaget.exe. The new mediaget.exe program has the same functionality as the original but with additional backdoor capability,” the Microsoft researchers explain in their blog.

Researchers believe MediaGet that signed update.exe is likely to be a victim of the supply chain attack, similar to CCleaner bug that infected over 2.3 million users with the backdoored version of the software in September 2017.

 

Also, in this case, the attackers signed the poisoned update.exe with a different certificate and successfully passed the validation required by the legitimate MediaGet.

The dropped update.exe is a packaged InnoSetup SFX which has an embedded trojanized mediaget.exe, update.exe. When run, it drops a trojanized unsigned version of mediaget.exe.”

Once updated, the malicious BitTorrent software with additional backdoor functionality randomly connects to one (out of four) of its command-and-control (C&C) servers hosted on decentralized Namecoin network infrastructure and listens for new commands.

It then immediately downloads CoinMiner component from its C&C server, and start using victims’ computers mine cryptocurrencies for the attackers.

Using C&C servers, attackers can also command infected systems to download and install additional malware from a remote URL.

The researchers found that the trojanized BitTorrent client, detected by Windows Defender AV as Trojan:Win32/Modimer.A, has 98% similarity to the original MediaGet binary.

Microsoft says behavior monitoring and AI-based machine learning techniques used by its Windows Defender Antivirus software have played an important role to detect and block this massive malware campaign.

 

 

The information contained in this website is for general information purposes only. The information is gathered from The Hacker News while we endeavour to keep the information up to date and correct, we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to the website or the information, products, services, or related graphics contained on the website for any purpose. Any reliance you place on such information is therefore strictly at your own risk.
Through this website, you are able to link to other websites which are not under the control of CSIRT-CY. We have no control over the nature, content and availability of those sites. The inclusion of any links does not necessarily imply a recommendation or endorse the views expressed within them.
Every effort is made to keep the website up and running smoothly. However, CSIRT-CY takes no responsibility for, and will not be liable for, the website being temporarily unavailable due to technical issues beyond our control.